Young People’s Pavilion – P is for Potato: An Idaho Alphabet (Discover America State by State)

Young People's Pavilion

By The Book Bearimages

I first met Stan “The Bookman” Steiner at a reading conference many years ago. He was dubbed “The Bookman” by his students because of his vast knowledge of children’s literature. That is why I was very pleased to see that the acclaimed Discover America State by State series continued with his P is for Potato: An Idaho Alphabet. Lyrically written with his wife Joy, this title explores the lush land and rich history of a state too often overlooked.

Kids of all ages wil love the A to Z rhymes boasting about all the treasures found within Idaho’s borders- from the Appaloosa steed to the zinc mines to Mount Borah, to, you knew we couldn’t forget it, the potato. But after a few pages readers will also allow peregrine, Union Pacific, Quinceanera, Nex Perce, and other Idaho icons to share in the spotlight.

Amazon reveiwer K…

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Young People’s Pavilion: Drones, robots and slime … oh my!

Originally posted on IdahoEdNews.org on January 23, 2018

Things got pretty wild at the Statehouse on Tuesday when kids took over the Rotunda with flying drones, robots and Play-Doh.

Students from elementary to high school showed off their technology and engineering skills to lawmakers in celebration of STEM Matters! — a campaign to raise awareness about science, technology, engineering and math in Idaho.

The Idaho STEM Action Center hosted more than 300 Treasure Valley students who showcased their classroom STEM projects and tools. Students showed off their critical and creative thinking skills they are using at school.

“This is inspiring and makes you dream bigger when you’re outside the classroom,” said Joseph Murphy, a junior at Centennial High School.

Joseph Murphy, a junior at Centennial High School, explains circuits to elementary kids using potatoes and a laptop.

The STEM Matters! event is part of Education Week at the Statehouse as lawmakers begin to piece together the budgets that will drive public schools and higher education campuses in the year ahead.

The 2015 Legislature created the STEM Action Center to build a workforce to match the employment opportunities in STEM. The center’s strategy is to strengthen Idaho’s STEM career pipeline with education and professional development for teachers. The STEM Matters! event features how taxpayer money is spent in the classroom.

“We know that it is critically important to show outcomes and impacts to ensure that taxpayer and industry funds are spent wisely,” said Angela Hemingway, the executive director of the STEM Action Center. “We use data to make informed spending, program and policy decisions.”

Hemingway asked legislators to fund the Idaho STEM Action Center at $4.7 million during her budget presentation to the Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee on Jan. 17.

According to the Department of Labor, Idaho’s unfilled STEM jobs doubled in 2017 to nearly 7,000, which represents approximately $450 million in lost personal wages and $24 million in lost state tax receipts. The Idaho Department of Labor predicts as many as 36,000 STEM jobs could be unfilled by 2024 if the trend continues and would represent more than $120 million in lost state tax revenue annually.

The STEM Action Center is housed under Gov. Butch Otter’s office.

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RobotsRecommended Reading: Guinness World Records: Remarkable Robots (I Can Read Level 2)

A brand-new Guinness World Records book for kids!

From a robot babysitter to the largest walking and fire-breathing robot, this book is filled with record-breaking androids of all shapes, sizes, and occupations! Simple text and full-color photos will make learning about this exciting topic fun for beginning readers.

Guinness World Records: Remarkable Robots is a Level Two I Can Read book, geared for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.

Read more children’s book choices at youngpeoplespavilion.com

CWI’s Connections Project celebrates culture, collaboration, education, innovation, and achievement

College of Western Idaho student, Emma Obendorf, is the winner of the 2018 Connections Project logo contest. Obendorf, a student in the Studio Art Program, has a passion for graphic design and was excited to design a logo.
College of Western Idaho (CWI) student, Emma Obendorf, is the winner of the 2018 Connections Project logo contest. Obendorf, a student in the Studio Art Program, has a passion for graphic design and was excited to design a logo.

The logo will be distributed in marketing materials such as t-shirts, websites, and flyers. Obendorf also received $100 for her winning design — which she plans to put into savings.

“It’s a bit surreal! I don’t think it’s hit me that this will be seen at the event,” she said while describing the strong contenders she competed against.

CWI’s Connections Project celebrates culture, collaboration, education, innovation, and achievement. The contest gave students an opportunity to showcase their skills in design, while incorporating the event’s mission statement in the logo.

“I like the simplicity, figuring out what people see first and how it all goes together,” Obendorf said.

Fifteen students submitted PDFs of their proposed designs. Twenty faculty and staff judged the logos, without access to students’ names, and chose their favorites. Assistant Professor of Art, Karen Brown, said Obendorf is a professional student who is easy to work with. Brown was impressed with her logo design.

“I like that it clearly connects to our visual identity and branding,” she said.

In addition, Brown stated she enjoyed the honeycomb design in the logo, reminiscent of a structure bees are always building and rebuilding, a similar process the College goes through as students graduate.

Obendorf is appreciative the College asks students to design the logo for the event as it helps her feel more involved.

“I went to a really small high school, so I kind of like the community aspect. I think it’s cool the College asked students to participate in the contest and helps to get our work recognized,” Obendorf said. “It is very tight-knit, it’s easy to get to know your professors and classmates and get involved in stuff.”

Save the date for this year’s Connections Project April 26, 2018.

Learn more about the event and find a link to submit projects by March 23 at cwidaho.cc/current-students/connections-project.

 

Why Does the Pseudo-Left Hate Grover Furr?

National Spotlight. 

This one comes to us from the east coast.

The Espresso Stalinist

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by Espresso Stalinist

Grover Furr is an American professor and author. He has taught at Montclair State University in New Jersey for over four decades, and has written essays, articles and books on Soviet history in both Russian and English. Though his body of work covers a wide variety of topics, his most famous writings study the period of Soviet history under Joseph Stalin, particularly regarding controversies around the Moscow Trials, the Katyn “massacre,” the events in Poland in 1939, the murder of Sergei Kirov, the Ukrainian famine and Khrushchev’s “secret speech.” Furr’s research on the history of communism, Soviet history and the historical falsifications told against socialism is some of the most remarkable, ground-breaking and enlightening in the world. He uses a very precise and admirable document-based approach to research that is exceedingly valuable and hard to find elsewhere.

This approach, unsurprisingly, has won him more than a fair…

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Review: Bostyx at Nampa Civic Center

By Michael Strickland

As we ponder our 123idaho message of great thoughts and great causes, what could be a better cause than bringing people together with music that has inspired generations?

I’d have given about anything for tickets to a Boston or Styx show some 40 years ago. That’s why nostalgic chills went through my spine when I learned that Bostyx featuring David Victor formerly of Boston was going to play in my home town of Nampa, Idaho. When it comes to classic rock, the songs of Boston and Styx and are legendary. Their music survives despite constantly changing musical trends.

Boston One

Victor brought an array of world-class musicians  to the Nampa Civic Center on Nov. 18.  Helping to handle the distinctive lead vocals of Styx co-founder Dennis DeYoung was multi-talented drummer and lead vocalist, Glenn Jost.  With the accompaniment of guitarist/vocalist Roby Duron, bassist Manny Aguirre and keyboardist/vocalist Victor Bender, the band reproduced Boston’s soaring guitar harmonies and lightning-fast keyboard runs. They also added the lush vocals and theatrical style of Styx, while the bassist provided a steady groove to all those thump-heavy rockers.

Bostyx opened the show with the Star Spangled Banner and an array of richly harmonized riffs. They moved into Rock and Roll Band, one of several Boston songs with the theme of making music and how music makes them feel. Then they broke into the boogie groove that persists throughout the song “Smokin.’”

Victor, who lived a “Rock Star” dream being plucked from a tribute band into the namesake band, the multi-platinum Boston; had a strong night on vocals. He adeptly handled the sounds of one of the finest rock tenors of all-time, Boston’s Brad Delp. Victor’s performance included “Don’t Look Back,” the hard rock masterpiece from Boston’s second album.

Every Bostyx band member helped provide the soaring harmonies that made those classic  anthems stand out in pop music history.  Their Styx tunes melded the power of a hard-rock guitar balanced with acoustic guitar, drums and keyboards.

The band’s set came packed with memorable Styx morsels, from 70s favorites “Grand Illusion,” “Blue Collar Man,” “Come Sail Away”, “Lady” and “Renegade,” to “Foolin’ Yourself,” “Too Much Time on My Hands,” and other hits. The 1981 Billboard top ten Styx anthem “Best of Times” was followed by Boston’s mega-hit, the exceedingly high-pitched mainstay “More Than A Feelin.’” From the first notes to the final falsetto cries, Victor impressively handled this very difficult vocal.

BostyxMore Boston followed. The self-explanatory choice “Party” began with a short, slow introduction before a surprising change of pace to the fast, harder sound that persists throughout the rest of the song. “Feelin Satisfied,” an upbeat, affectionate tribute to the power of music, was the opener after intermission, filled with clear singing and fresh sounds.

The crowd would not let the band leave without an encore. The band obliged with “Foreplay”  a progressive instrumental prelude. Bender nailed the rapid triplet keyboard arpeggios, while the band joined with synthesizer-like swoops, complex bass and drums, and lead guitar at the end. The song flowed naturally into “Long Time,” with its three epic guitar solos. Their “Foreplay/Long Time” treatment was a perfect marriage of electric and acoustic sounds.

The Nampa Civic center manages to offer a mixture of close-community and  arena feel inside a space with a several hundred seats.  This night of power, grace and precision from Bostyx was convincing. With fluid expertise and the swagger of a national act, Bostyx is a must-see for anyone who wants to be transported back to the magic of Boston and Styx.